Black Clay

Asymmetrical Vase

Black Clay

Asymmetrical Vase

10.5" H x 9" D"
Contemporary Handmade
Mexico
$125 Sale

This piece is handmade from black clay, or barro negro, from the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico. The... READ MORE

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Provenance

Contemporary Handmade
Mexico

This piece is handmade from black clay, or barro negro, from the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico. The black color is the result of a natural oxidation process, free of chemicals, lead, or glaze. The use of Oaxacan black clay to produce pottery dates back to Zapotec times, when it featured a matte grey finish. In the 1950's, a potter of Zapotec ancestry developed the beautiful patina seen today by burnishing the pottery before putting it in the kiln. This St. Frank piece has been fired at a high temperature, a technique used in the Oaxacan valley for centuries to reduce porousness and increase durability in Mezcal and water containers.

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This vase is hand-molded from black clay.

Care and cleaning: Your black clay tableware was created in traditional craft techniques and should be handled with care to help ensure its preservation. Please clean with water and soap. Do not clean in dishwasher.

All orders placed after 2 PM PT will be processed on the next business day. Allow 2-7 business days for delivery for standard shipping. Expedited shipping options are available at checkout.

*Please note that as a unique, handmade item, no two pieces are ever exactly the same and color varies across monitors. Our website photos are a close representation of this work, but may not be identical to the piece you receive.

Provenance

This piece is handmade from black clay, or barro negro, from the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico. The black color is the result of a natural oxidation process, free of chemicals, lead, or glaze. The use of Oaxacan black clay to produce pottery dates back to Zapotec times, when it featured a matte grey finish. In the 1950's, a potter of Zapotec ancestry developed the beautiful patina seen today by burnishing the pottery before putting it in the kiln. This St. Frank piece has been fired at a high temperature, a technique used in the Oaxacan valley for centuries to reduce porousness and increase durability in Mezcal and water containers.