Brown Peace Coasters

Decorative Accessory

Brown Peace Coasters

Decorative Accessory

4.25" IN DIAMETER
CONTEMPORARY HANDMADE
Rwanda
$35 Sale

The Agaseke, Rwanda's oldest traditional basket, is now called the Peace Basket, as it has become a symbol of... READ MORE

WILL SHIP BY 12/16

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Provenance

CONTEMPORARY HANDMADE
Rwanda

The Agaseke, Rwanda's oldest traditional basket, is now called the Peace Basket, as it has become a symbol of unity to the post-genocide nation. The Agaseke was traditionally used for transporting gifts. Today, it is a cultural emblem that represents generosity, gratitude, and compassion. These St. Frank coasters are created in the same traditional weaving technique of the Agaseke. They are handmade by women whose family members were either killed in the 1994 genocide or are imprisoned for genocide-related crimes. Weaving has provided the women with socioeconomic opportunity and rebuilt a devastated community. May these coasters offer peace and hope for a brighter future!

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This set of four natural fiber woven coasters comes tied with a black grosgrain ribbon, and includes a card with the coasters' .

All orders placed after 2 PM PT will be processed on the next business day. Allow 2-7 business days for delivery for standard shipping. Expedited shipping options are available at checkout.

*Please note that as unique, handmade art, no two pieces are ever exactly the same and color varies across monitors. Our website photos are a close representation of this work, but may not be identical to the piece you receive.

Provenance

The Agaseke, Rwanda's oldest traditional basket, is now called the Peace Basket, as it has become a symbol of unity to the post-genocide nation. The Agaseke was traditionally used for transporting gifts. Today, it is a cultural emblem that represents generosity, gratitude, and compassion. These St. Frank coasters are created in the same traditional weaving technique of the Agaseke. They are handmade by women whose family members were either killed in the 1994 genocide or are imprisoned for genocide-related crimes. Weaving has provided the women with socioeconomic opportunity and rebuilt a devastated community. May these coasters offer peace and hope for a brighter future!