Biddew Noir II Accent Framed Print

Senegal
$480 Sale $370
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This archival print is float-mounted on a natural linen, which provides a 1" border between the print and frame. The piece is offered in a modern black or white cap, or lucite frame. The print itself is subtly blind embossed with our monogram in the bottom right hand corner. The frame is equipped with wire to be hung either vertically or horizontally. Dimensions vary based on framing options:

Lucite: 16.25" W x 16.25" H

Black and White: 17.5" W x 17.5" H

Polishing

Surface gloss can be maintained by using a soft cloth and specialty plastic cleaner or polish, following cleaning fluid container instructions.

Cleaning

Begin by gently blowing away any loose dust or dirt from the lucite surface. Using a mild soap solution or a plastic cleaner and a non-abrasive lint-free cloth, wipe the surface using light pressure. To remove grease, oil, or tar deposits use hexane or kerosene followed by a soap solution.

Removing Scratches

Fine scratches may be removed by hand polishing with a plastic polish scratch remover. Remove all residue and polish with a soft cloth.

Framed textiles are custom framed once they are ordered. Allow 4-6 weeks for framing and delivery. Expedited options may be available by emailing service@stfrank.com.

This item is fully refundable if returned within 30 days of delivery.

Provenance

Johanna Bramble's work combines a modern aesthetic with traditional textile weaving. The artist, a Senegalese designer, is passionate about preserving time-honored weaving methods. She has a strong contemporary curiosity, leading her to incorporate new materials into her creations. This allows her to work through heritage textiles to reveal new insights.

Bramble believes weaving is a universal language. The Senegalese weaving technique Bramble employs is rare today - shared with few other countries in the world. It requires two people and meticulous execution. One weaver, the apprenti, assists the other. Coordination between the two allows for the creation of elaborate patterns, such as the hexagon motifs on this piece. This approach is the precursor for mechanized Jacquard weaving that is common today.

Woven textiles, or serru rabal in the Wolof language, are the most cared for objects in a Senegalese home. They are treasured by women who dress their fabrics with incense. These textiles, loaded with symbolic meaning, are presented at specific moments in life, from birth to death. Even today, serru rabal are used as a shield against evil. Bramble's contemporary pattern displays the hexagon - a symbol of wisdom, life, and health present in Islamic, Christian, and Judaic history. Bramble created both the positive and negative versions of this symbol to reinforce the idea of unity and complementarity, much like the concept of yin-yang in Eastern thought.